Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

CBT

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Abstract

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapy which is based on cognitions, assumptions, beliefs, and behaviors. Research shows that it is useful for problem solving or coping with problems as one strives through life.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is a psychotherapy which is
based on cognitions, assumptions, beliefs, and behaviors.  It is intended to influence negative emotions that relate to inaccurate appraisal of
events.  Research shows that it is useful for problem solving or coping with problems as one strives through life.

CBT was developed from behavior modification, Cognitive Therapy and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy, and it has become widely used to treat various kinds of neuroses and psychopathology, including mood disorders and anxiety disorders.

The particular therapeutic techniques vary according to the particular
kind of client or situation

Common treatments include:

  • Keeping a journal of
    significant events and feelings, thoughts and behaviors
  • The questioning and testing of cognitions, assumptions, evaluations and
    beliefs
  • Gradually facing
    important activities which may have been avoided
  • Trying out new ways of
    behaving and reacting
  • Relaxation and distraction techniques

CBT is widely accepted as an evidence based, cost-effective psychotherapy for a range of disorders and
psychological problems.  The techniques are also commonly adapted for
self-help manuals relating to coping and improving performance at work, study, and life skills in general.

CBT takes a realistic approach to therapy using reasonable time scales for improvement, and claims for efficacy are kept accurate to encourage reasonable expectation in the client.  A well founded research stream is ongoing on various aspects of CBT which receives peer review from the general academic clinical population.

Links

http://www.babcp.com/

 Morgan K; Dixon S, Mathers N, Thompson J, Tomeny M (Feb 2004). “Psychological treatment for insomnia in the regulation of long-term hypnotic drug use” (PDF). Health Technol Assess 8 (8): 1–68. National Institute for Health Research. PMID 14960254.

Beck, Aaron T. Cognitive Therapy and the Emotional Disorders. International Universities Press Inc., 1975.